Scientific Sessions

Cardiac Diagnostics

Many people with an implanted heart device resume their normal daily activities after full recovery from surgery. However, there may be certain situations that your doctor will ask you to avoid. Your doctor or nurse will provide guidance for your particular condition, but these are some general guidelines to follow after your recovery. As with any medical procedure, there are risks involved in a heart device implant and results may vary. Talk to your doctor about any specific concerns or activities — such as returning to work or participating in exercise or sports — that you may have.  After you receive your heart device you may also still have to take medication as directed and periodically your doctor will need to monitor your device.

Health societies recommend the use of echocardiography for initial diagnosis when a change in the patient's clinical status occurs and when new data from an echocardiogram would result in the physician changing the patient's care. Health societies do not recommend routine testing when the patient has no change in clinical status or when a physician is unlikely to change care for the patient based on the results of testing.

A common example of overuse of echocardiography when not indicated is the use of routine testing in response to a patient diagnosis of mild valvular heart disease In this case, patients are often asymptomatic for years before the onset of deterioration and the results of the echocardiogram would not result in a change in care without other change in clinical status.

Electrocardiogram (ECG)

Echocardiogram

Holter monitor

Thallium scans or myocardial perfusion scans

Positron emission tomography (PET) scan